Sunday, August 24, 2014

In Our Digital World are Teens Losing the Ability to Recognize Emotions?



In Our Digital World are Teens Losing the Ability to Recognize Emotions?


One of the components of emotional health is the ability to recognize one's own emotions and the emotions of others. Without the ability to recognize other's emotions correctly it could lead to misunderstandings, arguments, and cause difficulties in relationships. I have lived without my cell phone and computer for a week this summer and could tell a big difference in my ability to focus, concentrate on what other's were talking about, and overall more present in what was going on around me.

If teens are saturated with digital media and less face-to-face communication, what does this mean for them when they become adults? What could this mean for the future? Should digital media be limited to a few hours per day for teenagers?

8 comments:

  1. I agree with the article. We don't really notice it in ourselves, but the more connected you are to your screen, the less you pay attention to those around you. While this could definitely affect some job forms, such as those that require a lot of social interaction, many jobs are slowly making the shift to more and more digital forms of communication. With the amount of technological advancement our society has made, it's unlikely our jobs will require much human interaction. However, this can affect young adults' relationships, both romantic and platonic, and increase levels of social anxiety due to an inability to cope with others and one's own emotions.

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  2. Although this post seems extremely credible, I don't believe that digital media has such a great effect on all of us. Perhaps, for these sixth graders who spend four and a half hours on their televisions or phones every day, their ability to read emotions is slightly damaged. However, I don't see this as much of a problem for high schoolers, who have less time to spend on the internet and who interact with each other all day during school. Basically, I think that if this was tested on a different, older group of people, we would see much different results.

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  3. I disagree with this article. I personally spent two months this summer without any types of electronics and noticed no change in my ability to read emotions, or any change at all, really. This article was also focused on a very small group of very specific people; had the experiment been done on multiple age groups I might have had change in opinion, but it was very focused on sixth graders. While I think that some kids should spent less time with electronics than they currently are, I don't feel as though generalizing young people solely off of a study of sixth graders is correct.

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  4. I agree with this article completely because although at times technology can be useful, it has become something that teens consistently overuse. Many teens spend hours online and I have noticed that they become less social to the others around them. I have noticed fellow teenagers who will be with their friends but will not even be talking but will instead be reading things on their phones. This shows how it has gotten to a point where teenagers use their technology so often that they do not socialize as much as they use to which then leads to a decrease in social interaction.

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  5. I have a lot of mixed feelings about this article. I agree with Erica and Jenna Bell to some extent because it is true that technology is so prevalent in today's society that it almost acts as a social crutch. However, I also agree with Jenna Smith and Claire in the fact that this article seems to make sweeping generalizations about young people from one small study with a very specific age group. This article brings up an interesting point about technology that I had not even considered but does so in a problematic way. I'm a little tired of articles that try to discredit modern technology and write it off as something that is ruining our youth but the point presented in this article should be kept in mind as we continue advances in technology.

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  6. For the most part, I do understand why people might worry that social media takes away teens' ability to interact effectively in real life. However, it seems to me that a lot of the time, adults are grasping at straws to try and prove that social media is detrimental to today's youth without enough real evidence. I don't see how a study can effectively gauge a person's ability to recognize emotions just by showing them pictures and videos, because emotions are incredibly complex and go well beyond "she is smiling, so she is happy." I also agree with Tzv, Claire, and Jenna Smith that the study does seem too limited to a very specific age group. Mentally, there are many differences between 11 to 12 year old 6th graders and 15, 16, and 17 year old juniors and seniors, which is the primary age group of our health class. There also may have been other factors involved in the test results; for example, since the group that had no access to technology was all away at the same camp, they may well have had their emotion-reading skills improved by having to share rooms with other kids. There were too many additional factors present for the study to prove that the reason behind the supposed difference was the students' overuse of technology.

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  7. I disagree with this article, I think that technology is going to change our identity at all, I spend weeks on end camping and that just makes me find my identity even more. I don't think you can dictate what people are going to be based off of a study done on sixth graders, who are still maturing and becoming a young adult.

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  8. I agree with the fact that technology makes it harder for kids to read emotions but I think that only occurs during extreme cases. Kids need to interact with parents, peers, and teachers on a day to day basis for sustenance. There is no way someone could go for a day without having some sort of basic human interaction. Kids often need to interpret emotions from text messages or other sort of messaging from peers which would help develop their emotional health as well. I also think that technology should be used in classrooms because it helps to streamline the education process. If a student can take a picture of the notes instead of writing them all down then there is more valuable time to do other more important activities.

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