Friday, September 18, 2015

Culture Shock

Culture Shock


As we learned in health class, sleep can affect your emotions as well as experiencing culture shock. Our emotions can make it difficult for us to adjust to new cultures which is called culture shock. There are so many new changes we have to adapt to after leaving a familiar culture which can result in making our emotions vary such as feeling lonely, sad, anxious, or homesick. I can relate to this article because when I went to Nicaragua by myself, I had a hard time adjusting to the culture at first as I was frustrated with my lack of Spanish skills and I felt left out because of religious differences therefore not being able to connect with my community. As time went on, I was able to adapt and it allowed me to get past the overwhelming feelings and embrace the differences in our cultures.

  • Have you experienced culture shock?
  • If yes to the first question: When and where did it happen? What was different about the other culture that made it shocking to you?
  • If no to the first question: If you haven’t experienced culture shock, what examples can you think of for possible culture shocks?

14 comments:

  1. I have experienced shock before when I was little when I went to Hong Kong with my family and I wasn't really able to speak chinese to people around me. I knew the culture fairy well but when it got to a point when I didn't really know about a little part of the culture I was really shocked because I wasn't able to do it but everyone around me expected me to know. So I was pretty upset with myself and not knowing how to do it but as time when one I really realized how to do it and I felt better about myself and now I know more of the language and more about the culture.

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  2. While I have experienced culture shock on the whole "going to another completely different culture" scale, I wanted to bring up a much smaller version of this. Sometimes, when I go to my friends house, everything their is completely different than my life. The way he organizes or talks to his parents or does things is completely different than the way I do things in my life. Could this be considered a form of culture shock? Maybe a micro culture shock?

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    1. Yes that is considered culture shock since being in a new environment- even just a friend's house can open your eyes to a different culture than what you're used to rather than the whole cultural immersion in another country example I had. You can have culture shock from just seeing the differences in how they act and communicate to even smaller details like an example in the article was how you shake hands with someone when meeting them or what time you eat which Nancy said was how she experienced culture shock. I'm glad you brought up the smaller version of culture shock since I'm sure it happens often in everyone's lives.

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  3. I have experienced culture shock in this country actually even though I was born in this country but with immigrant parents from Mexico. I experience the culture shock because I would go back and forth from Mexico to here everything's way different over there Sundays are day to spend with your family so tau days business are all closed so when I was here everything was open and eating hours are completely too for instants at 3 pm is the time to eat dinner and in America it is like at 6-7 so I believe that was my culture shock.

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    1. That's really interesting Nancy! I hadn't thought of it in that perspective of having culture shock in the United States, so I'm really glad you brought up your own experience!

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  4. I have experienced culture shock. Over the summer I went to Cairo, Illinois (on that note you can experience culture shock without going to another country. Even just going to somewhere else in the US can change your perspective). The area I went to is a poor, small town that has pretty much nothing, but the people there are really welcoming and nice to everyone. It was just a really cool experience because in California, people don't talk to each other. They just stick to their own group. Where I went, everyone said hello to each other and you could have a 5 minute conversation with a complete stranger, it was really great. Coming back to California, it just made me miss the welcoming and kindness that the people showed in Illinois.

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  5. I have experienced culture shock before. This year I went to a poor town in Alabama, the buildings where old, decaying, and covered in vines. The streets where basically empty with only a few buildings that were still populated. What surprised me was that I could never find a town like this in California if I tried, and I had always thought that California represented America pretty well on how our towns and cities look. What was also really surprising was that the people their were just as happy as the people in our town, but they found happiness in each other and community.

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  6. I have experienced culture shock before. It happened two years ago when I visited my aunt back in Argentina. It was hard to adapted to the life system, specially because during summer the sun goes down early and it was hard to do fun stuff. Also adapting to the type of food was hard.

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    1. I have experienced culture shock before because of my friends families. One time I went to their very traditional Mexican family dinner and I was surprised to see how different it was. The food, music, and language really made me feel as if I were in Mexico.

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  7. I experienced culture shock in America because the way people treat here is different to the way people treat back in Singapore and Korea. I had hard time adjusting to the treatment of the American people here and even now, after a year, I still feel a bit awkward when talking to Americans.

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  8. I experienced culture shock in America because the way people treat here is different to the way people treat back in Singapore and Korea. I had hard time adjusting to the treatment of the American people here and even now, after a year, I still feel a bit awkward when talking to Americans.

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  9. I have not experienced culture shock before. Examples of culture shock is the way people being treated, the foods, the language, the lifestyle, and the way people are dressed.

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  10. I have not experienced culture shock before. Examples of culture shock is the way people being treated, the foods, the language, the lifestyle, and the way people are dressed.

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  11. I guess I have experienced culture shock on a low level, I visited my grandmother in Wisconsin over the summer. There, neighbors actually communicate to one another, they hang out together, have block parties and yes they go next door to ask for a cup of milk. I thought this was the cutest thing ever and I wish more people were like that. The dark side of the culture in Milwaukee is when driving around I noticed that it is segregated, not like in the Civil Rights movement but like a social way, black people were more walking around on the streets with only other black people and whites only with whites. It was so odd. I am used to seeing several different races on a daily basis

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