Thursday, January 14, 2016

Are teens losing the ability to recognize emotions?

In Our Digital World are Teens Losing the Ability to Recognize Emotions?


One of the components of emotional health is the ability to recognize one's own emotions and the emotions of others. Without the ability to recognize other's emotions correctly it could lead to misunderstandings, arguments, and cause difficulties in relationships. I have lived without my cell phone and computer for a week this summer and could tell a big difference in my ability to focus, concentrate on what other's were talking about, and overall more present in what was going on around me.

If teens are saturated with digital media and less face-to-face communication, what does this mean for them when they become adults? What could this mean for the future? Should digital media be limited to a few hours per day for teenagers?

32 comments:

  1. I think that the relationship between technology and social interaction can actually be both positive and negative. It depends on how one uses it. If someone uses it to communicate more with friends and family then it's a good thing. However if they use it to socially isolate themselves then it is no longer a good thing. I think a good rule to go by is never be more attentive to your device than the people you are talking to face to face.

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  2. I agree with this article. I think kids and teenagers spend way to much time on devices these days, and it is getting out of hand. Many people say things over text that they would never have the guts to say face to face. We are losing human interactions and instead getting it all through a screen. I dont know how to make things better but i think we should try and get off our phones more and connect with those around us.

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  3. The reality of society in this day in age is that most interactions actually happen through media. While this has led to extreme advances in technology, it has come at the cost of emotional communication, and - by extension - empathy. As evidenced by the study, the more time children spent viewing the world through screens, the worst they were at recognizing human emotion. This is extremely troubling, as we are entering a society in which human interaction is boiled down to an emoji, or a Facebook post. According to the article, "If you're not practicing face-to-face communication, you could be losing important social skills." This is precisely why Millennials are so terrible at face-to-face conversation. Ironically, they are losing important social skills from all the time they spend on social media. Look up from your phone for two seconds, and you may find that there's more to a person than 140-characters.

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  4. Oh my what a great study by the school of UCLA, I read the article I know who did the study. I have the feel that the future we are part of will be slightly screwed. The world left to us will be different, but then when we cannot even go a day without looking at our phones, liking the one photo, or start swiping at people. If we cannot even talk to our friends, without glancing at our phones then... wait did you read this Diego's last sentence it's fire. Even if you put a limit on a teenager's technology use, they will find loopholes; because we are dealing with new kind of addicts. Technology addicts. Eh still not as good as Diego's.

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  5. Teenagers who don't interact much and spend lots of time on the internet will have social issues as they become adults. When they turn into adults they will be so consumed with technology and have not enough face to face time with humans that human emotion will be irregular to them. Human interaction is essential to teenagers because the amount of how much they spend with other will affect how they will turn out as they get older."..could tell a big difference in my ability to focus, concentrate on what other's were talking about.." The article has a real life account from a a teenager who is usually consumed with social media and shows how taking a break from it changed in just one week. The account shows how the behavior of the teen changes for the better and their social behavior changed.

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  6. I think that the study conducted in this article was very troubling, but I don't really believe that humans are losing a sense of empathy due to phones and social media. The article states multiple times that we are becoming less aware of nonverbal emotional cues, and while that may be true, I also think that, since so much of modern communication happens through texting or social media, we are much better at using words to communicate. It would be interesting to see a study about whether we have a heightened sense of verbal empathy that has displaced our nonverbal empathy.

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  7. The rise of technology has taken the future of the kids and the future of us in all. Kids are tied down for "an average of four and a half hours" watching tv and playing games on a school day. Kids are seeing less and less of each other physically and more and more technologically. The lack of seeing physical facial expression attributes to this problem. We can't stop the use of technology since it is 2016 and more and more technology are popping up.

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  8. This article fails on multiple levels to present a logical argument. Even apart from the findings themselves, the sample size is ridiculously small for an issue of this gravity, and the decision to use 6th graders for this study is questionable at best. The main issue I take with the study is the fact that not all variables were accounted for - the article presents its findings as the results of students going without technology, when it actually represents the effect of students spending time at the "Pali Institute." The study could just as easily be used to demonstrate the positive benefits of young people living with one another. In fact, I would argue that the data better supports the merits of students living among each other at the Pali Institute than it does point out negative effect brought about by technology.

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  9. If teens are 24 hours on their phones or computers it will effect their social skills just like the article said. The article says that the children who did not attend the camp did substantially worse than the ones who were away from their devices. School forces children to be away from their devices and interact with others. Parents should not give a 6 year old an iphone or ipad, they have no need for that.

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  12. In my opinion, teens and children in our age are on technology way too often, but I don't believe that it affects our ability to recognize human emotions. This is not a skill that is easily forgotten, and hours of technology each day will not hurt this ability. However, I do agree that giving young children technology will affect their development of social skills, but as long as a person is involved in routine social activities such as school, they should be fine in terms of recognizing emotions, regardless of technology use.

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  14. The study shows the for the people who went to camp the first week communicated better when they did not have their phone on them, they could recognize emotion better than the kids who did not go to camp. The kids who went to camp adapted to it easily which doesn't seem possible. For kids of that age to even own a phone is odd. Children should not get phones until they have proven to be responsible about it. This study should have been run on people in an older age group

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  15. I personally agree with this topic because it is becoming a bigger issue daily as people spend more time on their phones than talking to other people face to face. Recognizing emotions is a very necessary skill as a human being, and the fact that teens are loosing this ability could have disastrous consequences in the future. However, I do believe that technology is a useful means of communication between long distances, and allows us to talk to people instantly instead of trading letters that might not even get there. On top of this, wouldn't skype video calls be the solution? They allow you to see the person you are talking to, and give you the ability to see their emotions on their face.

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  16. I agree with the statement because i also think that teenagers spend too much time on their phones and they sometimes miss opportunities. It is also not good for your eyes. When a teenager interacts with other people it benefits him or her a lot and it is essential in our lives. The change of 14-9 seems significant therefore people should spend less time on their phones and spend more time talking and interacting with other people.

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  17. Technology shouldn't be able to affect ones emotions that would only vary on the person of how he or she chooses to become advancing in life may seem odd and appear to be affecting kids in this time but the emotions of a person cannot be changed by a screen this article is failing in many ways because it makes it seem like advancing in the world is not helping the kids because their social skills are failing but what they fail to realize is that a child's social skills can only vary upon he or she.

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  18. While I do believe that this is a legitimate concern for many people, I do believe that technology's social benefits are being overshadowed. With the internet, people can connect to many people around the world and communicate with people who they otherwise might not have ever had the chance to meet before. With regards to the test, I do believe that the sample size is too small to make a sweeping generalization. Only 106 6th graders is not enough. The theory of reduced social skills due to increased screen time does make sense, but I don't believe that laws reducing screen time would be effective. For instance, South Korea already has a "Video Game addiction law", which restricts video game use for minors to certain hours. Critics have stated that it wasn't the video games that were the problem, it was improper parenting, saying that kids turn to screen time to relieve stress, and that parents should open up lines of communication with their children to reduce their stress.

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  20. I think that social skills are important for people who work in the society in the future. We can use face-to-face interaction to study other people's emotions and their nonverbal cues. "You can't learn nonverbal emotional cues from a screen in the way you can learn it from face-to-face communication." It shows that long time use of media devices will impede the understanding of people's emotions. We should learn these skills when we were young because children can be easy to participate in activities with other people. If teens are lack of social skills, they won't be a good officer worker in the job market or they won't be a clever being in the society because they don't know how to recognize other people's emotions and it shows that they are very clumsy. In my opinion, media devices should be limited a few hours per day because we can have more time to communicate with other people and collect experience about how to build a healthy relationship between yourself and other people.

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  21. While I do believe that the increased use in technology is a problem, I don't believe that the experiment proves that the increase in technology directly impacts the ability for young people to read emotions. This experiment does not have enough evidence and is not thorough enough to support the thesis.

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  22. I agree with this blog to a certain extent. I agree that technology has slowed down our ability to communicate and interact socially in person. For most using technology is a easier way for people to interact with each other. Though I do not believe that teen use of technology should be limited. I believe that it should be up to the people to decide how much use is enough. Teens should be able to have discipline to limit there use if they so choose.

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  23. I agree with this blog. Teenagers spends too much time on their phone rather than being productive out there. They miss several good opportunities. This blog states that kids who attended camp the first week communicated better without their phones.

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  24. In my opinion, technology and social media has really taken over people's lives; which can be a good as well as a bad thing. Teens today are constantly using technology, which as the article states causes a "Decreased sensitivity to emotional cues -- losing the ability to understand the emotions of other people" which leaves teenagers lacking an ability to communicate as well as is expected today. I think that the study that was conducted is a great example of the impact technology has on teenagers; which I have personally seen first hand. I also go to a summer camp that doesn't allow students to have cellphones and technology, and the impact it makes on everyone's behavior is obvious.

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  25. Although I do agree that teens misuse technology in a bunch of different ways, the article does not apply to all teens as it only conducted a test on a small group of people not enough to generalize teens on this controversial topic. There is insufficient evidence overall that supports the article's claim. I personally think that people are able to recognize other people's emotions while also being an active technology user. It just depends on one's own personal and emotional engagement if they choose to connect with other people at the inside moment. I disagree that looking at a screen makes you lose empathy. Technology has both its good and bad aspects but I still disagree with the article. A screen does not literally control one’s actions and tells you what to do. It is up to you as a person of your own mind on how to handle things. Everyone has different sets of innate social skills that they could apply to situations and it is unfair to make a claim on teens based on a tiny test when they all have varying personalities and perception.

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  26. I believe that while face-to-face communication is still important in the 21st century, there is a growing need for emotion recognition via devices as well, such as detecting sarcasm in text or knowing what someone is feeling by the kind of photos they post online. This could also lead to relationship problems and major arguments if a word or phrase is taken the wrong way, so I would argue that this kind of emotional recognition is equally (if not more) important than face-to-face emotion recognition. I would expect a small drop in face-to-face recognition as teens develop their skills in digital emotion recognition, and I think it is important that people understand that online communication is a very important part of life in the modern era.

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  27. I think technology definitely has a role to play in modern communication, but I think it should be used more for last minute things, or long distance communication. Instead we seem to be using it for all of our conversations. The keyboard has become the new dictionary. It's a frightening thought, that we are less having "decreased sensitivity to emotional cues." In a way, our whole social structure has been built upon the new language of texting. Face to face communication is so much more meaningful and much more direct. I know from first hand experience that texting can sometimes be confusing and its hard to convey emotions like sarcasm in text. I think texting can be useful and should be used, but we should try to have the meaningful, important conversations face to face.

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  28. According to the article, I do agree that people do need to practice more "face-to-face communication" or balance social media communication with face-to face communication because not only do teens do this but everyone relies on social media too much today and rarely look up to see the many things that are around them. Not only are they missing out on what the world has to offer, while looking at a fossil most of the time but people are loosing emotional understanding of other people. I have seen someone telling their friend about a good/bad situation, and that friend is looking at their phone most of the time rather than looking at their friend, and giving advice on the situation. Therefore we should stop being so tethered to our phones and look up, and have more face-to- face communication.

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  29. I do agree with how teens and kids are on technology too often nowadays. I mean we are on the internet now writing this blog post! However, I disagree with the article's statement on how we are losing the ability to read others emotions and I beleive the test they did with the third graders isn't as credible than lets say a test with high schoolers. I did find their test really interesting and too much of anything is bad for you so I can't say I fully disagree I just disagree with the point of losing the skill to identify emotions.

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  30. I agree that teens (and even adults) spend too much time on technology, and that it can effect how we read each others emotions. I think it all just effects our over all communication, as I have seen one to many times were a group of friends are hanging out, and every single person is on their phone. I think when teens become adults and are still addicted to their phones, it might affect their ability to work at their fullest potential, as they will be distracted by their phones, but will also have a huge lack of face-to-face communication. I hope for the future that more people will see the bad affects of this addiction and fix the problem by limiting their phone usage. I think there should be a 2 hour limit on phone usage (spread through out the day).

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  31. I agree with this article. I think kids and teenagers spend way to much time on devices these days, and it is getting out of hand. Many people say things over text that they would never have the guts to say face to face. We are losing human interactions and instead getting it all through a screen. I dont know how to make things better but i think we should try and get off our phones more and connect with those around us.

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