Sunday, February 7, 2016

Sleepwalking


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150504120809.htm

He's asleep and he's walking

Question to ask you readers, how many of you sleep walk or know someone who sleepwalks? Answer that question, but do not blame yourself if you do sleep walk blame your parents. "The study found the prevalence of sleepwalking was: 22.5 percent of children without a parental history of sleepwalking developed sleepwalking; 47.4 percent of children with one parent who was a sleepwalker developed sleepwalking; and 61.5 percent of children developed sleepwalking when both parents were sleepwalkers." Younger children are less likely to sleepwalk, preschoolers are the one to sleepwalk the least. But as time moves on to 10 years the chance of sleepwalking increases. A major factor that increases the chance of sleepwalking is sleep terrors, sleep terrors are be afraid while sleeping. Screaming and intense fear, sleep walking and sleep terrors are closely related. Children who experience sleep terrors when young will most likely sleep walk in their later years. Do not blame yourself if you do sleep walk, blame your parents and those sleep terrors. 

Is there a cure for sleepwalking and/ or sleep terrors? Is sleepwalking dangerous? Should parents put up safety nets for their children if their sleep walking leads them too far? Do you think sleep walkers end up in weird places? How different do you think sleep terrors are from nightmares? Do you believe a cure for sleep walking will require therapy? 

9 comments:

  1. Sleep walking are definitely scary, sleep walking can be really dangerous too, how did sleepwalking even start.

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  2. I was really surprised by the sheer number of sleepwalkers. I accepted the statistics that 56% of kids ages 1 and a half and 13 to sleepwalk after remembering my older brothers adventures he went on while sleepwalking. It is definitely scary when someone sleepwalks as they know where they are walking (usually) and amazing how their motor reflexes can make them do certain actions. I can't say confidently that there's a cure, but I think as we age we naturally face our fears and get over them and even in the article there was no mention of people older than 20.

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  3. If parents themselves are sleepwalkers, this is definitely something to watch out for. I have no personal experience with sleepwalking, so I would have no idea how to act if I saw someone who was sleepwalking. You should definitely take precautions if you know it is a possibility. I learned about sleep terrors in psychology - they are definitely different from bad dreams. While dreams tend to evoke some of the things you had been thinking about the day before, night terrors do not seem related to your thoughts at all. You are simply trapped in a random, scary situation - my professor said that you should absolutely wake up someone who is suffering.

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  4. If parents themselves are sleepwalkers, this is definitely something to watch out for. I have no personal experience with sleepwalking, so I would have no idea how to act if I saw someone who was sleepwalking. You should definitely take precautions if you know it is a possibility. I learned about sleep terrors in psychology - they are definitely different from bad dreams. While dreams tend to evoke some of the things you had been thinking about the day before, night terrors do not seem related to your thoughts at all. You are simply trapped in a random, scary situation - my professor said that you should absolutely wake up someone who is suffering.

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  5. I found this article very interesting, as I had never really considered where sleepwalking comes from. I sometimes flirted with the idea that sleepwalking was more of a joke than a common occurrence. However, this article really opened my eyes to the prevalence of sleepwalking and sleep terrors, especially among people with genetically pre-disposed parents. I was fascinated by the statistic that "children with one parent who was a sleepwalker had three times the odds of becoming a sleepwalker compared with children whose parents did not sleepwalk." I guess sleepwalking is pretty genetic. I wonder how sleepwalking originates, though? Is it caused by some trauma, or is it just a strange mutation that seeps into a family's gene pool? Whatever the case, I need to make sure my future wife doesn't have that issue.

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  6. I never thought that sleep walking could be the result of genetics. This article is really interesting and opened my eyes to the possibility that genetics could be causing this weird habit. I don't know anyone who sleep walks. did use to wake up in the middle of the night to just walk around, but I was awake for that so that doesn't count. I always thought sleep walking happened to people who had too much energy but still needed to rest so their body just ended up moving around to get rid of energy but still get rested.

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  7. I feel as though if there is a house filled with potential sleep walkers then there could be an issue and there should be some precautions. I don't think Sleep walking could be undone by anything. I don't believe that there could be a cure for anything that is genetic.

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  8. I had trouble opening up the link but I really wanted to comment on your post. I think the topic of sleepwalking is very interesting, and to learn that it is likely hereditary is amazing! I wonder if theres a gene that programs for sleep terrors and sleepwalking. To answer a few of your questions: yes, parents should definitely instal safety precautions if the environment may be a risky place for sleepwalkers and/or if the sleepwalking is severe. Why not keep your child as safe as possible? If sleepwalking is hereditary, there could be a cure in gene therapy (turning the switch for the gene that makes sleepwalking happen off).

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  9. I had trouble opening up the link but I really wanted to comment on your post. I think the topic of sleepwalking is very interesting, and to learn that it is likely hereditary is amazing! I wonder if theres a gene that programs for sleep terrors and sleepwalking. To answer a few of your questions: yes, parents should definitely instal safety precautions if the environment may be a risky place for sleepwalkers and/or if the sleepwalking is severe. Why not keep your child as safe as possible? If sleepwalking is hereditary, there could be a cure in gene therapy (turning the switch for the gene that makes sleepwalking happen off).

    ReplyDelete