Thursday, February 25, 2016

Is it possible to grow a 3-D printed ear?



http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/22/science/its-possible-to-grow-a-3-d-printed-ear-on-a-mouses-back.html?ref=health

Bioengineers from Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have recently come up with a way to 3-D print organs. They created the structure of a human ear and placed it into the backs of mice and rats. The transplanted tissue had blood vessels and nerves running through it and it even was able to grow. The tissue is made of a mixture of human, rat or rabbit cells and gelatin. This could later lead to 3-D printed hearts in the future! I think this is awesome! It is a more comfortable way transplant organs because the donor wouldn't have to die or choose to live with out a kidney for example.

Would you feel more comfortable with a donor organ from a human or a 3-D printed one?
Would you feel confident that a man made organ would work properly?
How do you feel about 3-D printing body parts?

10 comments:

  1. Creating organs for cells of human and rats is what id prefer over taking organs from people because Animals are expendable compare to human lives. Although i m scared that it might not work in the body as a normal organ but will get better in the future. It's kinda cool though but its really disgusting because if i see a rat with an ear on its back, i would be freaked out.

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  2. This article outlined the many practical uses for 3D printed organs, which I believe are groundbreaking and innovative, such as transplants. However, the idea of printing body parts could lead to disturbing trends. Hearing the article speak about placing an ear on a mouse lead be to think about people putting random body parts all over their bodies. If 3-D body part printing became acknowledged worldwide, I'd assume that one day it will be the "cool trend" to put ears on your neck or something like that. With the crazy trends we have today, I wouldn't be surprised if people used printed body parts to alter their appearance, like they do with tattoos or piercings.

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    1. Your out look on this is very interesting. I never thought about the possibility of this later becoming a trend. Hopefully it does help save lives but I don't really know how I feel about body parts being a trend.

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    2. Your out look on this is very interesting. I never thought about the possibility of this later becoming a trend. Hopefully it does help save lives but I don't really know how I feel about body parts being a trend.

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  3. I have heard about 3D printing a lot before and the possibility of being able to print body parts for people in need of surgery's. I personally would rather have a donor organ over a 3D printed one, because I would be weary about something made by technology over what we were created with. But at the same time, if I had an illness that is life threatening and my only choice is to either have a 3D printed one or die from the illness, I would choose that. I agree with the article that there needs to be more testing and data first, "The team hopes that similar outcomes will occur if they implant their 3-D printed biostructures into people, and they plan to conduct human trials next."

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  4. I was very caught off guard when reading this article, because, although I've heard of 3-D printing, I didn't know it could produce actual human organs. The fact that scientists are now able to do this proves how incredible technology has become, and how much more could be waiting for us. But, as amazing as this is, I would definitely feel more comfortable with a donor organ from a human, because it seems a lot safer, and doctors have had much more practice with them. Also, just knowing that the 3-D printed organs are made with rat and rabbit cells is kind of offputting. However, I fully support these man-made organs because, according to the article, "more than 120,000 Americans are currently waiting for lifesaving transplants." If this discovery proves to be successful, it could revolutionize the medical industry, and save countless lives.

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  5. Heck no. That's crazy I would be most comfortable with a real organ. I wouldn't want something fake inside my body. Well I wouldn't feel highly confident about it, just semi confident. Because they are supposed to be like the real thing, so of course the scientists making these should make them functional. Really don't care about 3-D things, but I guess it's the way to the future. Soon more and more things will become 3-D printed. Good night.

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  6. I think that 3D printed organs are mind blowing! It is extremely difficult to find donors or donors that match the same blood type. Having 3D printed organs allows doctors to personalize the organ so that it works with the body its being made fore. To answer your question, I don't know how I'd feel with a 3D organ. I hope that if I ever need one it will be in the far future and will have hopefully been able to go through more trials. I would probably worry about the rat or rabbit tissue added to human tissue. There could be bacteria foreign to the human body in vital areas. That is why I will only feel comfortable after the thorough trials to be conducted in the future.

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  7. I think 3D organs would be cool! It's definitely a step forward to the future, and can lead to things like synthetic skin that looks and feels real, as well as having functions like real skin. But I certainly agree with the article about human trials.

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  8. I found it very cool that after 10 years of medical research scientists could complete something like this. But I personally would be scared to have one of these 3D organs in my body. Its not natural so I feel like scientists will encounter many problems with the organs over the future of testing the body parts.

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