Thursday, May 19, 2016

Fruit fly brains shed light on why we get tired when we stay up too late

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160519130131.htm

As we learned in class sleep deprived teen do worse in school, but what actually makes us so sleepy after losing sleep?  In a research done by scientists in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, they found out fruit fly brains and sleep work similarly to humans. This led to research which ultimately shows a part of the brain in the flies called the R2 neuron. Flies that got sleep only had this section light up once every minute, however flies that are sleep deprived lit up their R2 neurons four times every minute. Moreover the sleep deprived flies had R2 neurons light up in more places, more frequently, and brighter. Ultimately this concludes that sleep deprived teens will get tired more often and more intense desire to sleep compared to well rested teens. 

This is really interesting how we can do more research on fruit flies to hopefully find a way to solve problems such as insomnia and people with overactive sleep drive. 

Do you think further research into this can help cure sleep diseases or abnormalities? Do you think this can also lead to more potent sleep pills or even the opposite? 

4 comments:

  1. This article explains a lot about the traits and behaviors that go along with being sleep deprived. I feel like further research into this topic could definitely help find someway to interact better with those neurons, whether it be a way to make them act up even more or dull their activity. This can lead to things like more potent sleeping pills or a stronger, chemically advanced every drink. This can also help with sleep abnormalities, hopefully eventually helping those suffering from insomnia and sleeping beauty syndrome the same.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I feel like this article sheds light on why some people either sleep way too much or don't get enough sleep. It isn't necessarily the person making the choice, but the "R2 neurons" activity in the brain. Further research may be able to greatly help sleep deprivation and insomnia if researchers can find a way to be able to control that R2 neuron.

    ReplyDelete
  3. After reading what you said and explaining all this I actually have to agree because this is something that I've noticed first hand because I for one am known to not get any sleep and try to function on bare minimum sleep. While I'm at school I have noticed after a rather long night fighting the urge to sleep makes it even harder and sometimes i have succumb to the urge to take a nap mid-lesson. In your paragraph you mentioned that flies that get no sleep have that part of their brain light up more often. And i think that could possibly be like an alert telling the brain that it needs rest to function and the less amount of sleep the more it works. I wonder now if that's how we function and have that "alert" or something like that. Good article and good read ryan!

    ReplyDelete
  4. After reading what you said and explaining all this I actually have to agree because this is something that I've noticed first hand because I for one am known to not get any sleep and try to function on bare minimum sleep. While I'm at school I have noticed after a rather long night fighting the urge to sleep makes it even harder and sometimes i have succumb to the urge to take a nap mid-lesson. In your paragraph you mentioned that flies that get no sleep have that part of their brain light up more often. And i think that could possibly be like an alert telling the brain that it needs rest to function and the less amount of sleep the more it works. I wonder now if that's how we function and have that "alert" or something like that. Good article and good read ryan!

    ReplyDelete